Fire detection

 

 

Fire detectors sense one or more of the products or phenomena resulting from fire, such as smokeheatinfrared and/or ultraviolet light radiation, or gas.

In dwellings, smoke detectors are often stand-alone devices. In non-domestic buildings, fire detection will typically take the form of a fire alarm system, incorporating one or more of the following automatic devices:

flame detector is a sensor designed to detect and respond to the presence of a flame or fire, allowing flame detection. Responses to a detected flame depend on the installation, but can include sounding an alarm, deactivating a fuel line (such as a propane or a natural gas line), and activating a fire suppression system. When used in applications such as industrial furnaces, their role is to provide confirmation that the furnace is working properly; in these cases they take no direct action beyond notifying the operator or control system. A flame detector can often respond faster and more accurately than a smoke or heat detector due to the mechanisms it uses to detect the flame.[1][2]

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